Saturday, 26 August 2017

Man-ILL-Festo


Manifesto
Noun;
A public declaration of policy and aims, especially one issued before an election by a political party or candidate.

Man-ILL-festo
Noun;
A public declaration of aims from a diseased person, a mishmash word I just made up which has no basis in reality.

If you know anything about me, or have read almost anything I’ve written, you’ll know that I love a pun. I’ve you’ve read my book Go Your Crohn Way, you’ll have established it contains over 5015435 puns (that’s an approximation only). Some people love the puns, some hate them. They are the marmite smeared across my pages. But as the best writers are always telling us, ‘write what you’d want to read’ and I CAN’T EVER QUENCH MY PUN-THIRST.

Anyway I mention this merely as I’ve started the blog with yet another one. Sorry pun haters but I can’t always be what you want me to be.

So, what is this ‘Manillfesto’ I speak of? Well I’ve been thinking a lot lately about what I can do ‘better’ in the way I approach and manage my illness. Of course there are a myriad of things out-with my control, (having chronic illness in the first place being the main one of those), but there are a few small but powerful ways I’ve found I can help myself be the best and happiest version of me.  
[Most of these are just sensible rules for life for everyone to be honest so feel free to follow my manillfesto policies regardless of your health status lads].

-          TALK: don’t bottle up how I am feeling when I need help/comfort/company.

This is a continual issue for those with chronic illness as we often find it less emotionally exhausting to simply whip out “I’m fine” or the like when asked how we are. This is no one’s fault; it’s just often so much easier than explaining our every gripe and symptom again and again. It’s honestly tiring enough experiencing it all without feeling the need to vocalise it. However ‘I’m fine’ doesn’t really resolve anything when it’s used inaccurately. All it serves to do is worry the person on the receiving end (who probably knows you’re not fine anyway) and stops us from getting the support we might badly need. So I’m trying to limit my use of an erroneous “I’m fine” for emergencies only (i.e. when in the midst of a colonoscopy)

-          PROACTIVELY SELF-CARE: make time to make myself feel better

Self-care doesn’t have to mean completing 45 Yoga DVD’s then downing 15 Kale smoothies. It can be something as simple as finding what makes you feel comfortable and relaxed and actively making the space in your day for it. For me I love a hot bubble bath, headphones on, candles lit, channelling my inner Barbara Cartland and coming out barely conscious and a shade of lobster not yet discovered by scientists. So I try to make time a few times a week to have my precious soak. It’s also a nice way to physically relax achy joints and let your brain slow down. But if you don’t have a bath you can do other things; read a good book, paint, draw, watch a box set, go dogging, whatever makes you feel happy.

-          STICK TO AN ADULT BEDTIME: develop a regular sleep routine

This is important for many reasons, and more of a challenge than you might think. Those of us with chronic illness often find what should be horizontal bliss more of an uphill struggle. We often find getting enough sleep difficult depending on our pain levels, nausea, bathroom issues or medications. For example when I was on steroids I slept for about 5minutes over the course of 5months. When I did sleep through the sweats I’d dream of murder then wake up wanting to carry it out. I didn’t follow through on any of the dream-murders you’ll be pleased to hear. So try and ensure you stick to a suitable bed time and get enough where you can, it gets easier over time once you get into a regular pattern. Keeping a track of your sleep patterns is also useful for tracking flares and symptoms and for assisting the police in their enquiries regarding local murders.

-          TAKE A LUNCH BREAK: everyday, no excuses

This sounds minor but it’s very important. Most days I work through my lunch, eat my desk (when I remember to eat) and am lucky if I’ve had 15mins of a ‘break’ in a full day. This stems from work pressure, and a little anxiety about how much time I might spend in the loo from one day to the next. Regardless of my bathroom habits I’m still LEGALLY entitled to a break so I should be taking it without question or guilt. This is a habit I, and many of us need to break. Getting away from the desk/phone/whatever you’re chained to also helps to clear the head for an hour. Unless you are chained to someone else if you are a bungee instructor for example then please ensure everyone is safely on ground level before making your Pot Noodle.


So, some basic but important points to remember there. Little changes go a long way; prioritise, look after numero uno and make the best of each day even when you might feel like death is coming up the rear faster than an experienced Gastroenterologist. 


No comments:

Post a Comment